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Unioning file systems: Architecture, features, and design choices

Unioning file systems: Architecture, features, and design choices

Posted Mar 22, 2009 0:50 UTC (Sun) by jbreiden (subscriber, #7090)
Parent article: Unioning file systems: Architecture, features, and design choices

Great article. I'm very much looking forward to your next article, with practical advice about the various union filesystem options and their performance.

I suspect there is a relatively new use case for union filesystems, due to the increasing popularity of solid state drives. For example, I help run a server with many hundred gigabytes of small files on on XFS, on RAID-1, on rotating rust. There is enough reading and writing (and therefore seeking) going on to push the performance limits of the storage subsystem. So I bought one of those whiz-bang Intel SSD drives, with the intention of sending all writes to the flash drive, and using the rotating rust purely for reads (at least during normal operation). After some investigation of various unionfs options, I tried mhddfs since it sounded like the simplest thing to deal with. It didn't perform so hot, with load shooting up to about 700 before I killed it (maybe it was trying to replicate the admittedly large directory structure somewhere? Who knows?) So now I'm back to the primitive "manage everything with a rats nest of symbolic links" strategy.


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Unioning file systems: Architecture, features, and design choices

Posted Mar 25, 2009 5:57 UTC (Wed) by vaurora (guest, #38407) [Link]

Performance? That's for suckers! Seriously, I avoid writing about file system benchmarks like the plague - everyone's workload is different, and everyone's file system hasn't been optimized just yet.

Have fun with your new SSD!

Unioning file systems: Architecture, features, and design choices

Posted Apr 6, 2009 12:34 UTC (Mon) by tpo (subscriber, #25713) [Link]

I am having quite severe mhddfs performance issues. The cron job, that searches the filesystem to update the "locate" database regularily brings my system to a halt and I need to kill the job to be able to move the mouse.

This imho points to a larger problem within Linux but I did not look at it in more detail.


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