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Large I/O memory in small address spaces

Large I/O memory in small address spaces

Posted Nov 6, 2008 7:21 UTC (Thu) by jengelh (subscriber, #33263)
Parent article: Large I/O memory in small address spaces

Goddammit, glxgears is NOT a benchmark. The GL library might be cheating above 70 fps, because humans hardly notice fps changes that way up. And FWIW, if you think 380 is a lot, come again, runs on the later NV chpis (NV30 and up perhaps?) the fps rate is in the excess of 10000. Makes your 380 look like a joke.


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Large I/O memory in small address spaces

Posted Nov 6, 2008 8:06 UTC (Thu) by jamesh (guest, #1159) [Link]

In this case, glxgears wasn't being used to compare one GL implementation against another, but instead slightly different versions of the same driver.

Furthermore, if the driver in question did cheat at high speeds, I doubt David would have used glxgears as a test. Under those conditions, using glxgears was probably a simple way to determine the effects of the change.

Large I/O memory in small address spaces

Posted Nov 6, 2008 10:57 UTC (Thu) by Frej (subscriber, #4165) [Link]

Look, you have to start somewhere. It's not like linux <2.6 (or <2.6.10?) was that great for all kinds of workloads, and it certainly took quite a bit of work fixing it in the 2.5 and 2.6 series.

Nobody has really worked on graphics in the same way. This is just the beginning, besides hardware does not provide a generic interface such as the intel and amd hardware does. So it's not that easy.

Also, I'm sure nvidia has quite a bit of resources to throw at their driver. They even have time to hardcode (like rewriting shader x if game y). That is just insane from resource perspective.

Large I/O memory in small address spaces

Posted Nov 8, 2008 22:58 UTC (Sat) by vonbrand (guest, #4458) [Link]

I get around 1120 fps with glxgears (Fedora rawhide, x86_64, Intel Corporation Mobile GM965/GL960 Integrated Graphics Controller (rev 03))...


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