User: Password:
|
|
Subscribe / Log in / New account

Squashfs submitted for the mainline

Squashfs submitted for the mainline

Posted Oct 31, 2008 16:01 UTC (Fri) by giraffedata (subscriber, #1954)
Parent article: Squashfs submitted for the mainline

Another major change is to make the filesystem little-endian, so that it can be read on any architecture, regardless of endian-ness.

I'll bite. What's the connection between being little-endian and being readable on all endianness machines?


(Log in to post comments)

Squashfs submitted for the mainline

Posted Oct 31, 2008 16:26 UTC (Fri) by droundy (subscriber, #4559) [Link]

I believe this is in contrast to always using the endianness of the machine you're on. You could alternatively store the endianness in the FS itself, but if you just assume the endianness of the machine you're running on then you won't be able to read a given squashfs filesystem on both little- and big-endian machines.

Squashfs submitted for the mainline

Posted Oct 31, 2008 18:24 UTC (Fri) by jake (editor, #205) [Link]

> I believe this is in contrast to always using the endianness of the
> machine you're on.

This is correct I believe. mksquashfs would make it for the endian-ness of the machine it was run on (it also had options to make it for the other endian-ness for cross-fs-creation). A kernel could only read a squashfs made for its endian-ness. So, the fact that it is now little-endian is somewhat immaterial, it is that the endian-ness is fixed that matters.

jake


Copyright © 2017, Eklektix, Inc.
Comments and public postings are copyrighted by their creators.
Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds