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The Kernel Hacker's Bookshelf: Ultimate Physical Limits of Computation

The Kernel Hacker's Bookshelf: Ultimate Physical Limits of Computation

Posted Jun 19, 2008 13:32 UTC (Thu) by nix (subscriber, #2304)
Parent article: The Kernel Hacker's Bookshelf: Ultimate Physical Limits of Computation

The ultimate laptop looks like a thermonuclear explosion? If only! There's lots of actual
organized matter in that (e.g. it's not all monatomic hydrogen plasma so there's order in the
nuclei).

It's more like the aftermath of a total annihilation reaction: a blast of elementary particles
and wide-spectrum (mostly high-energy) radiation, all, of course, precisely positioned so that
it interacts neatly.

The engineering challenges involved in building this thing are significant :) and how you do
I/O I have not the least idea. I imagine you'd need smaller computers to mediate between the
ultimate laptop and anything else. This is post-Transcend stuff ;}

(Oh, and, er, why does this need to be on a kernel hacker's bookshelf exactly? I know the life
of a Linux kernel hacker is an exciting and never-ending whirl, but I didn't think it was
*this* exciting.)


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The Kernel Hacker's Bookshelf: Ultimate Physical Limits of Computation

Posted Jun 19, 2008 13:40 UTC (Thu) by nix (subscriber, #2304) [Link]

As an aside, if you want to consider even higher physical limits by making the computer as
dense as you possibly can in order to push up its mass and energy density, you start getting
into really interesting and bizarre stuff applying to black-hole-density computational
devices, like the holographic principle and the Bekenstein bound.


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