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Ten-year timeline part 6: almost to the present

Ten-year timeline part 6: almost to the present

Posted Mar 1, 2008 21:07 UTC (Sat) by xtifr (subscriber, #143)
In reply to: Ten-year timeline part 6: almost to the present by nix
Parent article: Ten-year timeline part 6: almost to the present

(Totally off-topic)

There are regional dialects which make the distinction at least in part.  For example, the
American South offers us the term "y'all", which is universally used (among those who use it)
as a second-person plural.  Although I'm not from the South, I find the term useful enough
that I occasionally drop it into informal speech or writing.  Unfortunately, I don't know of
any equivalent that is unambiguously singular.


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quasi-English plural and singular forms for 'you'

Posted Mar 4, 2008 6:16 UTC (Tue) by xoddam (subscriber, #2322) [Link]

Scots offers 'youse' as another effective second-person plural (this has also become common in
Australian vernacular in recent decades).

There is no modern-sounding English pronoun that is unambiguously singular, but the archaic
(some Northern English dialects preserved this usage up to the 1950s) 'thee' and accusative
'thou' will do, if you don't mind sounding vaguely biblical.

If you do use these, please please conjugate your funny old verb forms (thou dost, she doth)
correctly!


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