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Ten-year timeline part 6: almost to the present

Ten-year timeline part 6: almost to the present

Posted Feb 29, 2008 12:21 UTC (Fri) by daniel (guest, #3181)
In reply to: Ten-year timeline part 6: almost to the present by graydon
Parent article: Ten-year timeline part 6: almost to the present

Hi Graydon,

Nice to see you here, and nice to see you getting credit for the considerable advances you
brought about in the state of this art.

I wonder if anybody will ever chronicle my part in the story?

Regards,

Daniel


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Ten-year timeline part 6: almost to the present

Posted Feb 29, 2008 12:46 UTC (Fri) by zooko (guest, #2589) [Link]

Do tell.  I don't know your part of the story.  Nor your last name.

Ten-year timeline part 6: almost to the present

Posted Feb 29, 2008 17:14 UTC (Fri) by graydon (guest, #5009) [Link]

Nice to see you again too! But I must admit to not knowing all the twists and turns of your
part of the story to chronicle them correctly. I know some bits but I'd probably blurt them
out wrong. 

I didn't mean to imply that I invented the interesting ideas in monotone. Merely that it, as a
social and researchy development project, both discovered a few fresh ideas and consolidated /
refined many others, and has subsequently been a ripe source of ideas for its successors. I
did some of the work, but also made a ton of mistakes; the key theoretical work we stumbled
through during the course of monotone development was mostly the doing of others. Jerome
Fisher, Nathaniel Smith, Derek Scherger, Bram and Ross Cohen, Timothy Brownawell, Christof
Petig, Richard Levitte, Zack Weinberg, Peter Simons, Daniel Phillips, Emile Snyder, Markus
Schiltknecht, Paul Crowley ... and a long list of others who I am probably implicitly
insulting by not mentioning here (sorry, limited comment space).

We really lucked out, for whatever reason, in drawing together a group of exceptional people
to mull over the problem and push around potential solutions in code, without anyone getting
too pissy about "being right". It's been a really enjoyable and open community.


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