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The Kernel Hacker's Bookshelf: Synthesis: An Efficient Implementation of Fundamental Operating Systems Services

The Kernel Hacker's Bookshelf: Synthesis: An Efficient Implementation of Fundamental Operating Systems Services

Posted Feb 21, 2008 19:10 UTC (Thu) by bronson (subscriber, #4806)
In reply to: The Kernel Hacker's Bookshelf: Synthesis: An Efficient Implementation of Fundamental Operating Systems Services by ikm
Parent article: KHB: Synthesis: An Efficient Implementation of Fundamental Operating Systems Services

More code does not imply slower.  Think bubble sort vs. quicksort.

Besides, it sounds like the recompilations only happen at exceptional times.  I highly doubt
that they result in the sort of cache thrashing that you imply.


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The Kernel Hacker's Bookshelf: Synthesis: An Efficient Implementation of Fundamental Operating Systems Services

Posted Feb 21, 2008 19:33 UTC (Thu) by ikm (subscriber, #493) [Link]

The bubble sort vs. quicksort would be an incorrect analogy. The idea here is to inject
several optimized versions of the same code. My arguing was that one generic version might
perform better than a multitude of specialized copies of the same code.

The Kernel Hacker's Bookshelf: Synthesis: An Efficient Implementation of Fundamental Operating Systems Services

Posted Feb 22, 2008 10:46 UTC (Fri) by mingo (subscriber, #31122) [Link]

Yes. Especially as today's CPUs move towards annotating cache lines and doing certain
optimizations of the generic functions by observing their usage and annotating specific
instructions. Creating _more_ code goes into the opposite direction.


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