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Using Irssi to communicate within free software projects

Using Irssi to communicate within free software projects

Posted Jun 29, 2007 11:27 UTC (Fri) by ekj (guest, #1524)
Parent article: Using Irssi to communicate within free software projects

This is LWN.

You don't need to explain that it is possible to communicate with other developers over mailing-lists and/or IRC.

You don't need to explain that many developers are geographically dispersed.

You don't need to explain the difference between real-time chat and email, nor why one migth want to use both types of communication.

You don't need to explain what "IRC" means or what an "IRC Network" is.

And you very very definitely do not need to point out that terminal-based programs will generally also work in an xterm (or equivalent)

However, when you remove this useless fluff, what's left of this "article" is: 'There exists a terminal-based IRC-client named Irssi, it can have several windows, and can be extended by scripts. One such scripts makes adjustments to topic-handling.'

Which is completely useless. Sorry, but it's the truth.


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Using Irssi to communicate within free software projects

Posted Jul 3, 2007 22:21 UTC (Tue) by k8to (subscriber, #15413) [Link]

I would not go so far in the criticism, but more detail on effective communication using irssi would possibly be neat, if there is more detail to be had.

Using Irssi to communicate within free software projects

Posted Jul 4, 2007 6:16 UTC (Wed) by ekj (guest, #1524) [Link]

Yeah, Ok, I was being a bit harsh, and for that I apologize.

Still; it would be nice, as you say, to get significantly less of the useless surrounding fluff and more information about what, precisely, is special about the client, and why, precisely, anyone should care.

I don't think I'm much off the mark in claiming that "everyone" on Lwn already knows what IRC, xterms and mailing-lists are.


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