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OpenMRS might help more than the developing world

OpenMRS might help more than the developing world

Posted Jun 22, 2007 17:43 UTC (Fri) by man_ls (guest, #15091)
In reply to: OpenMRS might help more than the developing world by shane
Parent article: Google Summer of Code Series, OpenMRS

The aerospace industry uses the waterfall model exclusively, because it is the only way to get software that is proven to work to the level of safety and reliability required.
Where do you get that idea? The Space Shuttle primary flight software was developed using an iterative model: they put out releases every few months, not unlike the current kernel development process. It's even mentioned as an example on the wikipedia article.

The pure waterfall is definitely not the only way to get reliable software, in fact it is often the worst. Why not blame the methodology if it is not right for the job?


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OpenMRS might help more than the developing world

Posted Jun 25, 2007 9:35 UTC (Mon) by shane (subscriber, #3335) [Link]

The aerospace industry uses the waterfall model exclusively, because it is the only way to get software that is proven to work to the level of safety and reliability required.
Where do you get that idea?
I got it from a talk at the 23rd Chaos Communication Congress last December, Software Reliability in Aerospace, given by a software engineer who works in aerospace.

If you think about it, the waterfall model makes a great deal of sense for aerospace projects. In these, the requirements are usually understood in much more detail before coding begins than for a lot of software projects. Also, while getting the requirements wrong is costly in any project, when you are working with very expensive hardware it is disastrous. Finally, the benefit of having a partially-working system (for example just "core features") is much less or perhaps even nonexistant for aerospace.

DO-178B and waterfalls

Posted Jun 25, 2007 21:19 UTC (Mon) by man_ls (guest, #15091) [Link]

Fascinating stuff, thanks!


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