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Bitfrost: the OLPC security model

Bitfrost: the OLPC security model

Posted Feb 9, 2007 2:34 UTC (Fri) by bronson (subscriber, #4806)
In reply to: Bitfrost: the OLPC security model by cjb
Parent article: Bitfrost: the OLPC security model

I'm genuinely interested. I still don't understand how the GPLv3 can allow the OLPC to use DRM and at the same time prevent Tivo from abusing it. That's why I was asking about known modes of GPL abuse from the past. There will always be people who want to skirt the rules.

I *like* the GPLv2, and presumably I'll like the v3 when it ships. Ideally I'd like v3 to be able to be the go-to license for most projects. Other than the DRM language, which I'm unsure about, it looks like v3 could be that license.

Of course, I'm happy to let our discussion rest here and leave any further fine slicing to future litigators. :)


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Bitfrost: the OLPC security model

Posted Feb 9, 2007 2:49 UTC (Fri) by cjb (guest, #40354) [Link]

I'm genuinely interested. I still don't understand how the GPLv3 can allow the OLPC to use DRM and at the same time prevent Tivo from abusing it.
So, my understanding is that the GPLv3's answer to DRM is to say "Sure, you can build DRM -- after all, you wouldn't have freedom if you couldn't -- but you must give the person who you distribute the code to the freedom to remove the DRM if they wish". That's what Bitfrost tries to do.

How do you think TiVo would claim to be following that, yet abusing it? The methods you mentioned (waiting too long, or charging too much) just aren't ones that we've seen people abuse over the last twenty years; I can't think of a single memorable example of either, so it certainly hasn't been common. If they *do* provide the source+key that gives you full control of the system in a timely manner, then it's Free Software.

Bitfrost: the OLPC security model

Posted Feb 9, 2007 11:56 UTC (Fri) by NAR (subscriber, #1313) [Link]

you must give the person who you distribute the code to the freedom to remove the DRM if they wish

I think I get it - the code is distributed to the child, but not to the thief, so the thief can't ask for the key. However, an other thing occured to me. As far as I know, the children can't sell or give away their laptops, i.e. can't distribute it (I could be wrong here). Can they distribute the software (including the OpenBIOS) on the laptop? GPL (even v2) gives them the right, but will the software work on any other laptop (even if they distribute the key, which is part of the software under GPLv3)?

Bye,NAR


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