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The birth of the open source enterprise stack

The birth of the open source enterprise stack

Posted Jun 26, 2006 21:53 UTC (Mon) by tjc (guest, #137)
In reply to: The birth of the open source enterprise stack by dmantione
Parent article: The birth of the open source enterprise stack

Seriously, there were better to much alternatives available at the time, (PostgreSQL, AOLserver) which became niches, of which one reason was the LAMP marketing.
I don't recall that LAMP had much in the way of marketing (other than good press), but I might not have been paying attention.

One thing that PHP and MySQL do have in common is good documentation, and they are both easy to install, configure, and use, which are things that other projects often overlook or put off, sometime indefinitely.


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The birth of the open source enterprise stack

Posted Jun 27, 2006 7:33 UTC (Tue) by nix (subscriber, #2304) [Link]

PostgreSQL's documentation isn't half bad either, of course, unless the several thousand pages of the docs are purely an illusion :)

The birth of the open source enterprise stack

Posted Jun 27, 2006 14:22 UTC (Tue) by tjc (guest, #137) [Link]

It's not the amount of documentation that's important, it's the how well it's written, and -- especially important -- how well it's indexed (or searchable -- I'm a big fan of "on one page" manuals).

I can't comment on PostgreSQL's current state of documentation, but five years ago when I was doing a lot of internet programming I found MySQL and PHP both to have decent documentation, which is one of the major reaons I used them. I was able to learn enough PHP in a few days to get started, owing mostly to it's C-like syntax and comprehensive online function index, and MySQL was greatly aided by Paul DuBois' excellent book on the subject.

At the time PostgreSQL was complicated to configure, and Phython didn't look much like C. If I were doing internet programming today (and had more time), I might choose differently.

The birth of the open source enterprise stack

Posted Jun 29, 2006 6:29 UTC (Thu) by nix (subscriber, #2304) [Link]

PostgreSQL still is complex to configure, but only a very small amount needs to be done unless you're running a large site (in which case MySQL would need configuration too, if it coped at all).

The default config values for some things (shared memory size, notably) are laughably small: suitable for testing only. I don't know why they start out *so* small, but it's easy to change them.

The birth of the open source enterprise stack

Posted Jun 27, 2006 19:57 UTC (Tue) by hingo (guest, #14792) [Link]

I think you forget the most important reason. MySQL was available for Win32, while PostgreSQL was not (until now). Remember that only a few years ago 99% of students learning to do websites had modem connection to the internet, and 99% of them did not use Linux on their desktop computer.

I honestly think this is the one single reason MySQL beat PGSQL. Those kids simply never got to even try PGSQL. I also think this same issue has played a major role in the popularity of many Linux desktop apps, and how ironic is that!

The birth of the open source enterprise stack

Posted Jun 27, 2006 21:04 UTC (Tue) by tjc (guest, #137) [Link]

Remember that only a few years ago 99% of students learning to do websites had modem connection to the internet, and 99% of them did not use Linux on their desktop computer.
I'm not so sure about that. Most universities use UNIX or Linux in the student labs. Maybe some community colleges and trade schools use Windows, and self-taught people learning at home, but I wouldn't think that it would be anywhere near 99%.

The birth of the open source enterprise stack

Posted Jun 30, 2006 7:44 UTC (Fri) by grouch (guest, #27289) [Link]

"One thing that PHP and MySQL do have in common is good documentation [...]"

I would agree that PHP has good documentation, but MySQL's is atrocious. The comparison of documentation between MySQL and PostgreSQL alone is sufficient to use and recommend PostgreSQL.


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