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Too DRM-like

Too DRM-like

Posted Feb 16, 2006 6:23 UTC (Thu) by proski (subscriber, #104)
Parent article: EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL_FUTURE()

As in the case with DRM, the technical restrictions tend not to end when and where the legal limitations do. Surely the RCU patent will expire some day, but will the RCU API in the kernel return to its free-for-all state the same day? And how on Earth will EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL_FUTURE check that I live in a country where patents for algorithms are valid at all?

Cannot we just resist the urge to use technical means to enforce laws? It doesn't work well. I, for one, prefer due process of law for resolving legal issues.


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Too DRM-like

Posted Feb 16, 2006 16:03 UTC (Thu) by bronson (subscriber, #4806) [Link]

This isn't so much about enforcing the law as it is trying to put the squeeze binary-only modules. Personally, I'm all for it.

Too DRM-like

Posted Feb 16, 2006 20:45 UTC (Thu) by proski (subscriber, #104) [Link]

Actually, the practical effect of that change would be minimal, as the binary modules can still use traditional locking or a separate RCU implementation.

However, the psychological effect of acknowledging US software patents by Linux hackers and using a technical framework to "enforce" them worldwide should not be underestimated. Those who fought against software patents in Europe can be rightfully upset.

Too DRM-like

Posted Feb 24, 2006 11:32 UTC (Fri) by atrius (guest, #26979) [Link]

Bloody good for you. As always comes up for this subject, I presume you are okay with killing off the desktop market and insuring that in the near to long term there will be no good 3-D performance on Linux systems. Be it for games or for GL based interfaces.

And before anyone brings it up, using older cards and using the OpenSource drivers are not options. Telling people they must either use old cards or "crappy", read slow, drivers isn't going to win you users.

As much as it would be nice if there were decent open source drivers for high end video cards, it isn't going to happen any time soon. And no amount of presure from our user community is going to change that right now. We don't have enough of a market presence to force Nvidia and ATi to make those changes, assuming they are not bound by some other agreement that prevents it.

Too DRM-like

Posted Mar 30, 2006 9:11 UTC (Thu) by gowen (guest, #23914) [Link]

I presume you are okay with killing off the desktop market and insuring that in the near to long term there will be no good 3-D performance on Linux systems
The idea that good 3d performance is necessary for good desktop performance is a myth that just won't die. Accelerated 3D rendering is good for games and CAD, and next to useless for word processing, photo-editing, spreadsheets, programming, email, web browsing...

When was the last time you were writing an email and had to wait for the screen to update?

Too DRM-like

Posted Jun 2, 2006 14:38 UTC (Fri) by zlynx (subscriber, #2285) [Link]

When was the last time you were writing an email and had to wait for the screen to update?

Just yesterday, in fact. I'm using Gnome and Evolution on my desktop, and I've been using XGL/ Compviz with Nvidia binary drivers. Recently I switched back to the open source nvidia X.org driver, because of the X 7.1 update and a -mm kernel.

The speed difference in screen updates is massive. The open source driver is painfully slow. Scrolling a gnome-terminal takes more CPU time than the compile process creating the output. Switching email messages in Evolution lets me watch various bits of the screen update.

I can hardly wait until Nvidia updates their driver for X 7.1 and I can switch back.

Too DRM-like

Posted Jun 5, 2006 14:28 UTC (Mon) by nevyn (guest, #33129) [Link]

As I'm sure you know, nVidia is one of the few HW cards on Linux that lacks good 2d. All the alternatives either don't boot at all, or provide very good 2d (including the cheap, non-nVidia non-ATI cards ... which the majority of desktop users want).
Saying that, I haven't seen big problems with nVidia cards I've been forced to use ... at least not to the extent of draw updates being noticable when doing email. It's mostly things like the nv driver doesn't do dual screen etc. ... but then I try and use working HW (duh), so I don't spend much time with the nv driver.


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