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Conservative Automatic Stack Size Check

Conservative Automatic Stack Size Check

Posted Sep 8, 2005 9:12 UTC (Thu) by nix (subscriber, #2304)
In reply to: Conservative Automatic Stack Size Check by pkolloch
Parent article: 4K stacks for everyone?

Most stack allocation should be easily statically determinable
Some static determination is possible but not easy and not reliable (nor can it ever be reliable in the general case), and the error bars are large. See Olivier Hainque's paper in the GCC 2005 Summit proceedings for a pile of info on this.

TBH I'd expect that kernel developers' own hunches would be as reliable.


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Conservative Automatic Stack Size Check

Posted Sep 8, 2005 9:53 UTC (Thu) by pkolloch (subscriber, #21709) [Link]

After a moderate amount of web searching, I could find the abstract of the
presentation, but not the paper itself. Any pointers?

BTW I did not say that it "easy" for the general case, but for the kernel
without dynamic stack allocations and recursion. And OK, I was probably
naive and will agree that it is probably also difficult for this special
case ;) But both feasible and desirable. I hope Olivier Hainque will be
successful in his quest and his work will be applied to the kernel.

> TBH I'd expect that kernel developers' own hunches would be as reliable.

And predict which variables are being stored in registers and which on the
stack and considering all call paths? No, I think humans would miss a lot
of special cases on that one. Additionally, not anyone would actually
endeavor to do this for anything but some core functions. Am I wrong?

Conservative Automatic Stack Size Check

Posted Sep 8, 2005 11:42 UTC (Thu) by farnz (subscriber, #17727) [Link]

The paper starts on page 99 of the proceedings PDF. I've not found it split separately, and the PDF file is quite large (around 1.7MB).


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