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GNOME and high-level languages

GNOME and high-level languages

Posted May 12, 2005 14:37 UTC (Thu) by ncm (subscriber, #165)
In reply to: GNOME and high-level languages by socket
Parent article: A new Harmony Project

"Our strength comes with and partly because of a diversity of ideologies related to programming languages."

Really? From here it looks as if each of these ideologies saps our strength. Whether it's built-in garbage collection, or object orientation, "there's more than one way to do it", "lambda the ultimate, or "builds and does", we are the poorer for being locked into it, even if only in a single project. The best that might be said about a diversity of them is that it may undermine allegiance to any one of them. Even then, we are led to believe that anything common to all the languages we know is god-given.

We are better off with pragmatic languages. Survey the programs on your favorite distribution, and you'll find (in order) C, C++, a few in Perl, fewer in Python. Java is largely confined to programs for people who are already obliged (by corporate diktat?) to use it, or write it. These languages rule not because they're especially good at anything particular, but because they don't pretend to know better than we do what we're trying to do: C, because it doesn't pretend to know much of anything; C++, because it is happy to get out of the way; Perl, because it's all over the place.


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GNOME and high-level languages

Posted May 12, 2005 16:02 UTC (Thu) by shahms (subscriber, #8877) [Link]

Um, I think you'll find the actual order (at least for FC4) is going to be:
C, C++, Python, Perl. Almost all of the Fedora GUI system tools are Python. There are very, very few progams that are built using Perl. automake and autoconf are the biggest ones. foomatic also uses perl and I think libtool.

Don't get me wrong, there are a lot of packages that require perl, but most of these are perl modules and not applications.

GNOME and high-level languages

Posted May 12, 2005 17:20 UTC (Thu) by ncm (subscriber, #165) [Link]

That was what I expected to find, but it wasn't what I found. Your mileage may vary. I didn't look at a Red Hat system, which undoubtedly has lots of Python programs not found on other distros. Python is another pragmatic language, anyway, that "plays well with others".

GNOME and high-level languages

Posted May 12, 2005 23:05 UTC (Thu) by bk (guest, #25617) [Link]

automake/autoconf uses m4, or am I missing something obvious?

GNOME and high-level languages

Posted May 13, 2005 9:36 UTC (Fri) by wilck (guest, #29844) [Link]

autoconf: m4
automake: perl

That's what it used to be.

GNOME and high-level languages

Posted May 13, 2005 4:11 UTC (Fri) by green (guest, #29086) [Link]

For Fedora Core 4 the order will be C, C++, Java, Lisp/Scheme, Perl, Ada, Python, Assembly (ignoring shell scripts, most of which are auto* files anyways).

Here's the data to back this up:
http://www.spindazzle.org/green/index.php?p=33

AG

As I said

Posted May 13, 2005 6:08 UTC (Fri) by ncm (subscriber, #165) [Link]

"Java is largely confined to programs for people who are already obliged (by corporate diktat?) to use it, or write it."

Eclipse 1310322
OpenOffice 210424
ecj 181576
Xalan 158309
Ant 102443
Xerces 97919
KDE Bindings 66933
ANTLR 48279
GNU-Crypto 48083
libgtk-java 34358

How many of these are useful to somebody not already obliged to run Java, for being obliged to write it? Sure, Sun shoehorned the stuff into OO.o, but that's corporate diktat too.

GNOME and high-level languages

Posted May 14, 2005 14:58 UTC (Sat) by ohanssen (subscriber, #2761) [Link]

Well. I have seen examples of the opposite. People want to use Java, but are not allowed to (by some "corporate diktat"), because somebody strongly belives that dot net and C# is the right choice. And in another case, because of ideological reasons ("Java is not free software", etc. etc.).


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