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A look at Ubuntu "Hoary Hedgehog" and Kubuntu

A look at Ubuntu "Hoary Hedgehog" and Kubuntu

Posted Mar 24, 2005 3:09 UTC (Thu) by gomadtroll (guest, #11239)
Parent article: A look at Ubuntu "Hoary Hedgehog" and Kubuntu

I upgrade a Debian Sarge workstation to Kubuntu. One thing I noticed right away was the additional packages that were installed using the kubuntu-desktop meta package as opposed to what I get with the kde metapackage. Kubuntu is more of a complete desktop ecosystem rather than a group of kde apps , imho.

I really don't see the need to have a new release every 6 months. Maybe the developers get bored :-), but as a business user I don't like upgrading so often, Also presenting a stable environment for commercial software vendors is 'a good thing' imho.

Greg


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A look at Ubuntu "Hoary Hedgehog" and Kubuntu

Posted Mar 24, 2005 3:52 UTC (Thu) by bfields (subscriber, #19510) [Link]

I really don't see the need to have a new release every 6 months. Maybe the developers get bored :-), but as a business user I don't like upgrading so often, Also presenting a stable environment for commercial software vendors is 'a good thing' imho.

For your purposes, then, the important number is 18 months--that's how long they're promising support (in the form of security upgrades) for each version, so that's how often you'd probably end up having to upgrade.

--Bruce Fields

A look at Ubuntu "Hoary Hedgehog" and Kubuntu

Posted Mar 24, 2005 3:53 UTC (Thu) by bfields (subscriber, #19510) [Link]

For your purposes, then, the important number is 18 months--that's how long they're promising support (in the form of security upgrades) for each version, so that's how often you'd probably end up having to upgrade.

(Erm, sorry, note I'm talking about Ubuntu here--no idea about Kubuntu's plans.)

6 months has its advantages

Posted Mar 24, 2005 17:05 UTC (Thu) by dwheeler (guest, #1216) [Link]

Releasing every 6 months has its advantages, though. This means that instead of all-at-once massive changes that are hard to deal with, changes are a little more gradual. Thus, for example, if something stops working, it's easier to find the problem. It also makes it much easier to stay "more current", which on the desktop is more important because many of the desktop applications are faster-moving (and many people REALLY need/want those new features). Six month upgrades don't make sense on many servers, but on a desktop they make a certain amount of sense.


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