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The Grumpy Editor's guide to presentation programs

The Grumpy Editor's guide to presentation programs

Posted Sep 14, 2004 18:40 UTC (Tue) by mmarsh (subscriber, #17029)
Parent article: The Grumpy Editor's guide to presentation programs

Given the inclusion of markup-based packages, it seems somewhat surprising to me that the Grumpy Editor didn't include the old standby LaTeX, which in addition to the slides and seminar classes also has prosper. I've used LaTeX and seminar as well as OOo Impress, and while the latter is easier to use when it comes to creating diagrams, it can't compare for even simple mathematical expressions. In addition, I've never been satisfactorily able to inclue EPS in OOo presentations. For me, this is a big deal, since that's the format my externally produced figures will be in.


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Presentation programs for mathematics

Posted Sep 14, 2004 19:02 UTC (Tue) by jbh (subscriber, #494) [Link]

Indeed, mathematics seem to be the achilles heel of many of these presentation programs, and that's the reason I have (reluctantly) returned to latex slides for presentations. I'll take a look at prosper and pointless though, haven't seen them before.

Presentation programs for mathematics

Posted Sep 14, 2004 19:50 UTC (Tue) by aaa27 (guest, #13650) [Link]

> I'll take a look at prosper

Hendri Adriaens has developped the HA-prosper package, which runs on top of propser, and extends it. http://stuwww.uvt.nl/~hendri/Downloads/haprosper.html

I think it's an alternative well worth considering, especialy for scientific talks.
For LaTeX users, there are a bunch of packages out there, but prosper with HA-Prosper is without doubt (one of) the best ones.

André

The Grumpy Editor's guide to presentation programs

Posted Sep 14, 2004 19:14 UTC (Tue) by NAR (subscriber, #1313) [Link]

When I had to make a presentation, I used LaTeX too, because I needed to include mathematical expressions and EPS :-) I think the reason not to include LaTeX in the article is that you can only create the presentation in LaTeX, you need an other program (e.g. ghostview) to present the presentation.

Bye,NAR

Presenting LaTeX with acroread

Posted Sep 14, 2004 20:25 UTC (Tue) by bkw1a (subscriber, #4101) [Link]

If you use pdflatex, you can use acroread to present the resulting pdf.
Acroread is great for presentations.

Presenting LaTeX with acroread

Posted Sep 14, 2004 23:06 UTC (Tue) by tzafrir (subscriber, #11501) [Link]

Acroread, however, is a pain to work with when working on the presentation. Not only it lacks a "watch file" mode, like xdvi and gv (I don't remember if xpdf has such a mode) but reloading the presentation is too long a process.

xpdf is quite nice. xdvi can also be handy

Presenting LaTeX with acroread

Posted Sep 15, 2004 13:07 UTC (Wed) by scottt (subscriber, #5028) [Link]

xpdf reloads the file on a 'r' keypress or a page change.
It even has a full screen mode and a commandline controllable remote server mode similar to mozilla's.
If only it's development uses the standard CVS/mailing list/bugzilla combo ..

Presenting LaTeX with acroread

Posted Sep 16, 2004 19:42 UTC (Thu) by oak (guest, #2786) [Link]

My favorite way to do simple presentations with "LaTex" is to set paper
size to something very small in LyX (http://www.lyx.org/) and then create
the presentation with it (using Xdvi to preview it). Then when I want to
present it, I export it as PDF (or PS) and show it with Acroread (or Xpdf)
in fullscreen mode.

Miniscule page size, scaled to fullscreen -> presto, presentation with
suitable sized fonts. No need for any special presentation style. :-)

Compile LaTeX with pslatex, present with xpdf

Posted Sep 21, 2004 6:25 UTC (Tue) by komarek (guest, #7295) [Link]

Nice trick with the page size. Another "trick" is to use "pslatex" (comes with TeTeX on most GNU/Linux distros). It uses scalable fonts instead of bitmapped fonts. These fonts seem slightly "tighter", and will save you one column on an 8-page conference paper (can be very useful sometimes!). Also, the .ps file from dvips comes out much smaller. Conversion to pdf with ps2pdf works fine.

I learned all this when Adobe called the feds in on Sklyarov. I still avoid acroread because of that.

-Paul Komarek

The Grumpy Editor's guide to presentation programs

Posted Sep 15, 2004 10:55 UTC (Wed) by rknop (guest, #66) [Link]

When I need to include an EPS file in a computer presentation, I use the GIMP to convert it to a JPEG or (more often) a PNG (so that there's no compression artifacts, as usually I'm importing line diagrams and such). For instance, see: http://brahms.phy.vanderbilt.edu/deepsearch/hstpaper/inde... ... there I have the EPS files of the figures, and PNG files converted and anti-aliased with the Gimp for use on a 1024x768 presentation screen.

I've also used "ps2fig" followed by "fig2sxd" so that I can *import* the EPS file and edit it further in OOo. It would be nice if OOo could import EPS files directly, but these two programs let you work aroud the problem.

As for equations, some simple equations I do in OOo impress, but complicated ones I do in LaTeX and use ImageMagik to convert to something I'd want to import into OOo:

http://brahms.phy.vanderbilt.edu/~rknop/linux/teximpress....

-Rob

The Grumpy Editor's guide to presentation programs

Posted Sep 15, 2004 14:03 UTC (Wed) by mmarsh (subscriber, #17029) [Link]

I've had to convert EPS, too, and the results usually look like crap. Bitmaps just don't scale well, either up or down. I tried converting EPS to a vector format supported by OOo, and that was even less successful. Why, in a presentation program, they allow you to import EPS but only have it look correct when you print eludes me. Is gs really that difficult to embed?

Equations have the same problem, since you're ultimately using a font that's being turned into a bitmap. Even if I'm doing something that can be formatted easily in OOo (or Kpresenter), if there are any non-Latin characters it's a real pain to insert them. I end up cutting and pasting em-dashes, for example, because Open Symbols has a much more satisfactory dash.

The Grumpy Editor's guide to presentation programs

Posted Sep 16, 2004 3:30 UTC (Thu) by rknop (guest, #66) [Link]

I've had to convert EPS, too, and the results usually look like crap.

I've managed to have them come out looking decent. The tricks include: choose your final resolution to match pretty close to the resolution on the screen you'll be using in your presentation. When you use gs, convert the postscript file to something at *twice* your final resolution, and then use an image program of some sort (I use ImageMagick for batch processing) to scale the image down and get anti-aliasing on your fonts. Make sure that when you render the thing from LaTeX, you have a background color that is reasonably close to the background color you will use in your presentation, as some of that *will* leak through despite your best efforts of transparency and anti-aliasing. If you do all that, you can get pretty good-looking results with image files converted from EPS files. They don't *have* to look like crap if you do it right. -Rob

The Grumpy Editor's guide to presentation programs

Posted Sep 26, 2004 2:15 UTC (Sun) by roelofs (guest, #2599) [Link]

As for equations, some simple equations I do in OOo impress, but complicated ones I do in LaTeX and use ImageMagik to convert to something I'd want to import into OOo:

http://brahms.phy.vanderbilt.edu/~rknop/linux/teximpress....

Not bad, but I think whatever's doing the alpha-based antialiasing isn't doing it right (i.e., either IM is omitting the non-premultiplication adjustment on input or OOo is compositing in nonlinear [gamma] space on output). You're also missing a square bracket. ;-)

Greg

The Grumpy Editor's guide to presentation programs

Posted Sep 15, 2004 11:32 UTC (Wed) by wookey (subscriber, #5501) [Link]

Magicpoint trivially displays .eps files (%image file.eps IIRC).

I have had trouble with .ps from some sources where the bounding box isn't right so the pic ends up in the wrong place on the screen, and sometimes it's easier to convert to a bitmap image, but for simple diags .eps works very well. Our editor failed to mention this, implying that magicpoint only did PNGs.

I must admit that I like magicpoint a lot. It does the job, quickly and simply, looks sufficiently pretty, and tells you how long you have to go. The default colour settings are horrid though, and it is important to use an editor that doesn't mess with your tabs - tabs mean stuff in magicpoint files and so using it with some editors can be a bit of a fight.

So far as I can see the reason for lack of development is that the program is finished. More flexible HTML ouput might be nice, but essentially I don't see anything about the program that needs changing.

The Grumpy Editor's guide to presentation programs

Posted Sep 14, 2004 19:25 UTC (Tue) by dhess (guest, #7827) [Link]

Here's my presentation software of choice:

http://latex-beamer.sourceforge.net/

The Debian package is named 'latex-beamer'.

The output is beautiful, it's well documented, and I love being able to prepare a presentation in Xemacs. acroread makes a pretty decent presentation app, too, which I didn't know until I tried it. My only gripes are related to PDF, not LaTeX-Beamer itself: I don't like opaque binary file formats and I wish I could use something like ggv instead of acroread for the presentations, but for me, anyway, ggv just doesn't work very well on many PDF files.

I believe you can produce formats other than PDF, anyway, but I recall having some problems when I tried that and I was rushed for time.

I used this software for a presentation I gave back in March, after having tried Pointless two years ago at SIGGRAPH. Pointless isn't bad, and it's a lot more quick-and-dirty, but the output of LaTeX-Beamer is much nicer.

d

The Grumpy Editor's guide to presentation programs

Posted Sep 14, 2004 20:38 UTC (Tue) by lamikr (guest, #2289) [Link]

And latex-beamer with Lyx...

The Grumpy Editor's guide to presentation programs

Posted Sep 14, 2004 23:08 UTC (Tue) by tzafrir (subscriber, #11501) [Link]

try xpdf instead of acroread

The Grumpy Editor's guide to presentation programs

Posted Sep 15, 2004 21:13 UTC (Wed) by twiens (guest, #12274) [Link]

I must agree with the general comment that LaTeX merits inclusion as a tool to be considered. I'm using LaTeX with R, Python, and PostgreSQL to run some involved data analysis. In a matter of days I was able to script and run work that would have taken months to do manually. From this report output I was very easily able to use graphs and extract text into a very usuable presentation using the FoilTeX library for LaTeX in a matter of hours.

Thanks for the introduction to LaTeX beamer; it looks like a nice package which I'm sure I'll use in the future.

The Grumpy Editor's guide to presentation programs

Posted Sep 17, 2004 5:41 UTC (Fri) by vonbrand (guest, #4458) [Link]

If LaTeX, there is also the beamer package. It is much easier to use than prosper.


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